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Candy (chinese)
Название Candy (chinese)
Автор(ы) произведения Mian Mian
Жанр Современная проза
Язык Chinese
Серия

Аннотация

An international literary phenomenon-now available for the first time in English translation-Candy is a hip, harrowing tale of risk and desire, the story of a young Chinese woman forging a life for herself in a world seemingly devoid of guidelines. Hong, who narrates the novel, and whose life in many ways parallels the author''s own, drops out of high school and runs away at age 17 to the frontier city of Shenzen. As Hong navigates the temptations of the city, she quickly falls in love with a young musician and together they dive into a cruel netherworld of alcohol, drugs, and excess, a life that fails to satisfy Hong''s craving for an authentic self, and for a love that will define her. This startling and subversive novel is a blast of sex, drugs, and rock ''n'' roll that opens up to us a modern China we''ve never seen before. – Banned in China -with Mian Mian labeled the ''poster child for spiritual pollution''-CANDY still managed to sell 60,000 copies, as well as countless additional copies in pirated editions. – CANDY has been published in eight countries to date and has become a bestseller in France. *** Sex, drugs, and rock 'n roll: ingredients for novels about modern China? Yes, SHANGHAI BABY by Wei Hui (Pocket Books, 2001) showed international readers modern Chinese youth were not immune to the running dogs of Western decadence: Globalization might even include mixing with dissolute foreigners. Following SHANGHAI BABY to English by a few years, Mian Mian now suggests with CANDY the decadence is more likely homegrown, possibly an inevitable side-effect of China's ascension to manufacturing colossus for the world. After this first novel by Shanghainese Mian was banned in China -an "honor" Wei Hui also earned – she was labelled a "poster child for spiritual pollution." The buzz made CANDY an underground bestseller. Whether Mian Mian harvested autobiographical details for her protagonist Hong's drug-plagued odyssey is open to question. She prefaces the novel with a note: "This book exists because one morning as the sun was coming up I told myself that I had to swallow up all of the fear and garbage around me, and once it was inside me I had to transform it all into candy. Because I know you all will be able to love me for it." In a larger context, Hong's story, the characters in her life, often resonate with American stories we've heard of the Old West and Gold Rush days (whether in California or Alaska). She leaves Shanghai to seek her future in the new frontier of the Special Economic Zones the Chinese government created along the south coast in the 1980s, near Guangzhou. Not only did the SEZs permit a laissez faire approach to business-much of the Confucian social rules that apply elsewhere are ignored. In the SEZ thick with fortune seekers and finders, prostitution flourishes, as does alcohol and drug addiction. Hong, only 17, has dropped out of a competitive high school, somewhat dispirited by the suicide of a classmate (an echo of Murakami's NORWEGIAN WOOD), when she leaves for the south. There she meets a young musician Saining and they become lovers, so often hopeless for each other and so often hopeless for their addictions. They survive, slacker-style, largely by the generosity of Saining's mom, who lives in Japan. Hong's love for Saining has compelling moments of violence, promiscuity, and druggy indifference. But the greatest achievement of Hong's story, perhaps, is the honest testimony to the erasure of desire, the great sucking away of soul only addiction can wreak on a love that nonetheless won't go away. From a null point, from a Murakami-esque death in life, Hong goes on to find redemption can be hers.This stark portrait is not without lighter moments. For example, Hong's friend Bug is convinced he has AIDS. The horror of that discovery is brought alive. Page after page: consultation with friends, plans to leave the country, examination by a Beijing AIDS specialist. Finally, the revelation too many OTC drugs to get high had caused the troubling symptoms. Like Murakami's post-consumerist young generation in Japan, Mian Mian suggests the same search for individual authenticity is underway in China. As China 's economic engine gains force, so does disillusionment among the young with the old ways. Hong suggests her ambivalence towards China 's rising star: "The moment the plane left the ground, I fucking burst into tears. I swore I would never come back to this town in the South again. This weird, plastic, bullshit Special Economic Zone, with all that pain and sadness, and the face of love, and the whole totally fucked-up world of heroin, and the late 1980s gold rush mentality, and all that pop music from Taiwan and Hong Kong. This place had all of the best and all of the worst. It had become my eternal nightmare." Hong awakes before the CANDY is gone. Mian's compassion for youth of New China elevates and brings irony to a story lesser writers might have passed off as sensation-ridden heroin chic.
Niubi! The Real Chinese You Were Never Taught in School
Название Niubi! The Real Chinese You Were Never Taught in School
Автор(ы) произведения Eveline Chao
Жанр Словари
Язык Chinese
Серия

Аннотация

How to talk dirty and influence people-in Chinese! You can study Chinese for years, but do you really know how to talk like a native speaker? The next book in Plume's foreign language slang series, Niubi! will make sure you learn all the colorful vernacular words and phrases used by Chinese people of all ages in a variety of situations, including flirting and dating, wheeling and dealing, and even specific Internet slang-not to mention plenty of Chinese words that are… well, best not to mention. Accessible and useful to complete novices (Niubi! newbies), intermediate students of Mandarin Chinese, or just anyone who enjoys cursing in other languages, this irreverent guide is packed with hilarious anecdotes and illustrations, mini cultural lessons, and contextual explanations. So whether you're planning a trip to Beijing, flirting with an online acquaintance from Shanghai, or just want to start a fight in Chinatown-Niubi! will ensure that nothing you say is lost in translation.
Shanghai Baby (chinese)
Название Shanghai Baby (chinese)
Автор(ы) произведения Wei Hui
Жанр Современная проза
Язык Chinese
Серия

Аннотация

From Publishers Weekly Although it caused an uproar in the author's native China, Western readers will find 27-year-old Wei Hui's semiautobiographical offering reminiscent of fiction by the brat pack writers of the '80s, though more clich‚d and less edgy. Waitress Nikki "but my friends call me Coco after Coco Chanel" is in love with Tian Tian, a melancholy and impotent artist who falls prey to narcotics. Coco loves him madly, but not so madly that she wants to give up sex, and this is why she's also been seeing Mark, a married German businessman. Coco's deceptions, Tian Tian's problems with his wealthy mother (who he suspects killed his father) and the intertwining worlds of art and fashion are all fodder for Coco's upcoming slice-of-lifestyle novel, in which Shanghai 's privileged 20-somethings are shown in their natural habitat of clubs and coffeehouses. Beneath the techno beat, though, the sore subject of Western imperialism its avatars, this time, multinational managers still lurks. Among Coco 's friends, one known as Madonna stands out in particular: she earned a fortune first as a madam and then as the widow of a rich man. Wei Hui evidently wants to imitate her heroes, the beats and Henry Miller, and relishes observations like "our bodies were already tarnished, and our minds beyond help." But she spends more time analyzing people by the brands they use and the cars they drive, thus giving the book an odd air of beat fluff, as if Jack Kerouac had mated with Judith Krantz. The book is as alluring as a gossip column, but, alas, as shallow as one, too. (Sept. 11)Forecast: Forty thousand copies of Shanghai Baby were burned by the Chinese government. Proving censors make the best publicists, rights were subsequently sold in 19 countries 200,000 copies are in print in Japan alone. U.S. media curiosity is already high, but the resulting sales bounce may be minor. From Library Journal Wei Hui's debut novel, which was banned in China, delves deep into the dark and glittering heart of Shanghai, as experienced by a hopeful and hedonistic young novelist, Nikki (better known to her friends as Coco, after the also irrepressibly glamorous Coco Chanel). Although deeply in love with her impotent artist boyfriend Tian Tian, the frustrated Coco takes a successful German businessman as a lover. What follows is the painful and explicit sexual and vocational journey of a young woman in search of her true self, attempting to gain control of her own trajectory as nefarious forces work on her from both within and without. Indeed, it seems almost as if the city's over-the-top materialism drives its inhabitants toward adultery and dark passions, forcing them at once into the dual role of victim/accomplice. It is just such paradoxes that make Wei Hui's novel so complex and thought-provoking: she deftly explores the intimate relationships that belie the seeming oppositions of East and West, love and desire, the natural and the artificial, hedonism and spiritualism. Haunting and resonant, Shanghai Baby proves the existence of the sacred in the profane. For all Chinese literature and contemporary fiction collections. Tania Barnes, "Library Journal" *** Wei Hui's SHANGHAI BABY is the poetic, bittersweet and subtly spiritual tale of one woman's quest for personal fulfillment and drive for creative expression. The diverse and cultured city of Shanghai is more than the backdrop for the novel; it is a character itself. The city is celebrated by Hui, and its busy pace and natural sensuality contribute to the postmodern tone of the book. The most interesting character, however, is 25-year-old Nikki, the "baby" of the title. Nikki, known as Coco to her friends, is a writer. Unapologetic in her desire for both emotional and sexual satisfaction, Coco becomes involved with two very different men, all the while trying to write her first novel. But more important than the details of Coco 's exploration of sex is the novel's examination of life, freedom, love, and death. Each man Coco is involved with offers a different path for that examination and different answers to the same philosophical questions. Coco 's live-in boyfriend, Tien Tien, is a fragile and beautiful artist. The love between Coco and Tien Tien is sensual and spiritual. Obsessed by death, Tien Tien awakens in Coco an awareness of life and the importance of love. However, his impotence, physical but often emotional as well, leads her to a fierce and passionate affair with a married man. Strong, assertive Mark, a German businessman temporarily living in Shanghai, is the opposite of sensitive Tien Tien in every way. Coco 's fragile balance of juggling two lovers while writing her novel is upset as both men eventually become unavailable to her and she is faced with tragedy. SHANGHAI BABY is a beautiful novel. The language is poetic and sensual yet funny and brutally honest. Coco is frank in her confusions, frustrations, elations, and joys. She is joined by a bevy of interesting characters, including a former madam, a computer hacker, a bisexual fashion stylist, an avant-garde filmmaker, drug addicts, and artists, not to mention her parents who must overcome their traditional expectations in order to understand and support her artistic and personal choices. Each character is faced with the same issues as Coco and each attempts to make sense of relationships, sexuality, family, and life in a changing Chinese culture. While Hui implies the struggle between tradition and modernity is lessening (at least in cosmopolitan Shanghai) her forecast for a woman's chance to find both sexual and emotional fulfillment is less optimistic. We have been taught that through novels we can witness the changes and ultimately the growth of characters. As we read, they ideally become better people. Hui's novel is more challenging in that Coco does not fundamentally change and her growth is not overtly apparent. Hui's honest portrayal of Coco is both frustrating and refreshing and is thus an accurate reflection of the human condition. Coco 's vanity and selfishness (or confidence and trueness to her own needs) can verge on annoying; she is not always likable. However, she is capable of great insight. This view into contemporary Chinese culture and the issues of female independence and sexuality is worthwhile. Coco's controversial publication of short stories mirror Hui's own experience -- the sex and sexuality described by Hui in SHANGHAI BABY doomed the novel to condemnation, banning, and public burnings in China, where it was originally published. However, American readers may be disappointed to find that what is scandalous in China is more commonplace in Western literature. Although a fairly easy read, it is not a light one. The themes of death, sadness, and loneliness balance the themes of romance and passion. – - Reviewed by Sarah Egelman
Wolf Totem
Название Wolf Totem
Автор(ы) произведения Jiang Rong
Жанр Современная проза
Язык Chinese
Серия

Аннотация

An epic Chinese tale in the vein of The Last Emperor, Wolf Totem depicts the dying culture of the Mongols-the ancestors of the Mongol hordes who at one time terrorized the world-and the parallel extinction of the animal they believe to be sacred: the fierce and otherworldly Mongolian wolf Published under a pen name, Wolf Totem was a phenomenon in China, breaking all sales records there and earning the distinction of being the second most read book after Mao's little red book. There has been much international excitement too-to date, rights have been sold in thirteen countries. Wolf Totem is set in 1960s China -the time of the Great Leap Forward, on the eve of the Cultural Revolution. Searching for spirituality, Beijing intellectual Chen Zhen travels to the pristine grasslands of Inner Mongolia to live among the nomadic Mongols-a proud, brave, and ancient race of people who coexist in perfect harmony with their unspeakably beautiful but cruel natural surroundings. Their philosophy of maintaining a balance with nature is the ground stone of their religion, a kind of cult of the wolf. The fierce wolves that haunt the steppes of the unforgiving grassland searching for food are locked with the nomads in a profoundly spiritual battle for survival-a life-and-death dance that has gone on between them for thousands of years. The Mongols believe that the wolf is a great and worthy foe that they are divinely instructed to contend with, but also to worship and to learn from. Chen's own encounters with the otherworldly wolves awake a latent primitive instinct in him, and his fascination with them blossoms into obsession, then reverence. After many years, the peace is shattered with the arrival of Chen's kinfolk, Han Chinese, sent from the cities to bring modernity to the grasslands. They immediately launch a campaign to exterminate the wolves, sending the balance that has been maintained with religious dedication for thousands of years into a spiral leading to extinction-first the wolves, then the Mongol culture, finally the land. As a result of the eradication of the wolves, rats become a plague and wild sheep graze until the meadows turn to dust. Mongolian dust storms glide over Beijing, sometimes blocking out the moon. Part period epic, part fable for modern days, Wolf Totem is a stinging social commentary on the dangers of China 's overaccelerated economic growth as well as a fascinating immersion into the heart of Chinese culture.
Развод
Название Развод
Автор(ы) произведения Шэ Лао
Жанр Классическая проза
Язык Chinese
Серия

Аннотация

«Развод» написан в традиционной манере социально-бытового повествования, в нем изображено пекинское чиновники средней руки с их заботами и страстишками. С немалой долей иронии обрисованы мелкие люди, разыгрывающие из себя важных персон, их скучная жизнь с нелюбимыми женами, робкие мечты об иной, «поэтической» действительности. Но события убыстряют свой ход: арестовывают сына одного из персонажей, старания вызволить его приводят к гибели другого. Ирония отступает на задний план, фигуры становятся многомерными, сквозь, казалось, прочно сросшиеся с лицами маски проступают человеческие черты. Затем треволнения уходят в прошлое, река жизни течет по прежнему руслу. И только главный герой уже не может жить по-старому.
Soul Mountain (chinese)
Название Soul Mountain (chinese)
Автор(ы) произведения Gao Xingjian
Жанр Современная проза
Язык Chinese
Серия

Аннотация

"Soul Mountain is one of those singular literary creations that seem impossible to compare with anything but themselves… In the writing of Gao Xingjian literature is born anew from the struggle of the individual to survive the history of the masses." – from the citation of the Nobel Prize committee of the Swedish Academy When this year's Nobel Prize for Literature was awarded to Chinese expatriate novelist and playwright Gao Xingjian, few in the English-speaking West were familiar with his work. Gao's masterpiece, SOUL MOUNTAIN (PerfectBound, an e-book from HarperCollins; February 20, 2001; $19.95), is a dazzling kaleidoscope of fiction, philosophy, history and fable. Elegantly translated by Australian sinologist Mabel Lee, this richly textured autobiographical novel recounts a dual journey-a literal journey into the heart of China and a spiritual journey of the self. When Gao was 43, he was incorrectly diagnosed with lung cancer. Resigned to death by the same means that had claimed his father just a few years before, Gao spent six weeks indulging his appetites and reading philosophy. The spot on Gao's lung mysteriously disappeared, but a new threat arose when rumors began to circulate that he was to be sent to a prison farm because of his controversial writings. No longer facing imminent death, the writer quickly left Beijing and disappeared into the remote forest regions of Sichuan, then spent five months wandering along the Yangtze River from its source down to the coast. Gao's 15,000 kilometer sojourn forms the geographic parameters of the fictional journey in SOUL MOUNTAIN. While on a train at the start of his trip, the writer protagonist meets another traveler who says he is going to Lingshan, "soul mountain," which can be found by the remote source of the You River. The writer has never heard of such a place, and he resolves to go there, but his fellow traveler can give him none but the vaguest directions. Thus begins a metaphoric odyssey into the hinterlands of China and the outlying Qiang, Miao and Yi districts that dangle on the fringes of Han Chinese civilization. The writer is in search of the traditions that are hidden in rural China, and as he travels he encounters a parade of unforgettable characters who embody both vestiges of the past-Daoist masters, Buddhist monks, ancient calligraphers-and the modern culture that has surfaced since the revolution: small town communist cadres, budding entrepreneurs, independent young girls grappling with parochial repression. The two worlds exist uneasily as one, with stories and customs from centuries past colliding with a world of televisions, automobiles, and technology. All is permeated by the dark legacy of the Cultural Revolution, the encroachment of ecological damage, and the harsh monetary realities of everyday life in contemporary China. SOUL MOUNTAIN is a dazzling work of the imagination, where classic fables merge with tales of modern cruelty and ancient philosophy does battle with existentialism. But Gao goes deeper still as he explores notions of the devastation of the self at the hands of social expectations. He continually shifts his narrative voice as the "I" of the writer becomes the "you" of an imagined companion, then the "she" of a woman companion. Yet all reflects back on the protagonist, who craves these two seemingly contradictory ends-the solitude necessary for nurturing the self and the anxiety-provoking warmth of human society. Gao began this novel in the mid-eighties, then carried the manuscript with him when he fled China in 1987. Now living in Paris, he completed the book there in 1989. His writings continue to be banned in his native country. As Gao's work at last gains the public's attention here in the West, SOUL MOUNTAIN provides a dazzling introduction to the achievement of one of contemporary literature's acknowledged masters.
Чайная
Название Чайная
Автор(ы) произведения Лао Шэ
Жанр Драматургия
Язык Chinese
Серия

Аннотация

Шедевр драматургии Ляо Шэ "Чайная" в своих трех актах воссоздает – на крошечном пространстве пекинской чайной – три переломных этапа в истории китайского общества. Воссоздает судьбы посетителей чайной, через изменения в царящей в ней атмосфере, в манере поведения людей, в тоне и даже лексиконе их речей. Казалось бы, очень китайская и даже сугубо пекинская пьеса – разумеется в хорошем исполнении – впечатляет и зрителей в дальних странах.
Journey to the West (chinese)
Название Journey to the West (chinese)
Автор(ы) произведения
Жанр Классическая проза
Язык Chinese
Серия

Аннотация

Journey to the West is a classic Chinese mythological novel. It was written during the Ming Dynasty based on traditional folktales. Consisting of 100 chapters, this fantasy relates the adventures of a Tang Dynasty (618-907) priest Sanzang and his three disciples, Monkey, Pig and Friar Sand, as they travel west in search of Buddhist Sutra. The first seven chapters recount the birth of the Monkey King and his rebellion against Heaven. Then in chapters eight to twelve, we learn how Sanzang was born and why he is searching for the scriptures, as well as his preparations for the journey. The rest of the story describes how they vanquish demons and monsters, tramp over the Fiery Mountain, cross the Milky Way, and after overcoming many dangers, finally arrive at their destination – the Thunder Monastery in the Western Heaven – and find the Sutra. *** 《西遊記》是中國明代長篇神話小說,古代白話写成。全書20卷100回。吳承恩根據歷代民間傳說,對傳統題 材加以改造。故事取材於唐朝玄奘法師赴西域取經的真實事件,借鑑了大量古代神話和民間傳說,加上作者的大膽創造和想像,塑造了孫悟空、豬八戒、唐僧、沙僧 等個性鮮明的人物形象。《西遊記》的故事曾多次被移植到後世的戲曲、電影、小說、电玩游戏中,在日本等其他亞洲國家也出現了以孫悟空為主角的各類作品。
One Man's Bible (chinese)
Название One Man's Bible (chinese)
Автор(ы) произведения Gao Xingjian
Жанр Современная проза
Язык Chinese
Серия

Аннотация

One Man's Bible is the second novel by Nobel Prize-winning author Gao Xingjian to appear in English. Following on the heels of his highly praised Soul Mountain , this later work is as candid as the first, and written with the same grace and beauty. In a Hong Kong hotel room in 1996, Gao Xingjian's lover, Marguerite, stirs up his memories of childhood and early adult life under the shadow of Mao Zedong and the Cultural Revolution. Gao has been living in self-imposed exile in France and has traveled to this Western-influenced Chinese city-state, so close to his homeland, for the staging of one of his plays. What follows is a fictionalized account of Gao Xingjian's life under the Communist regime. Whether in "beehive" offices in Beijing or in isolated rural towns, daily life is riddled with paranoia and fear, as revolutionaries, counterrevolutionaries, reactionaries, counterreactionaries, and government propaganda turn citizens against one another. It is a place where a single sentence spoken ten years earlier can make one an enemy of the state. Gao evokes the spiritual torture of political and intellectual repression in graphic detail, including the heartbreaking betrayals he suffers in his relationships with women and men alike. One Man's Bible is a profound meditation on the essence of writing, on exile, on the effects of political oppression on the human spirit, and on how the human spirit can triumph. *** "Admirable dramatic intensity… valuable for its vivid piecemeal picture of 20th-century China 's culture of revisionist egoism, paranoia and repression." – Kirkus Reviews "Unforgettable… One Man's Bible burns with a powerfully individualistic fire of intelligence and depth of feeling." – New York Times "A remarkable achievement." – Christian Science Monitor "One Man's Bible… has come to claim its place as a powerful narrative… of the Cultural Revolution's insidious, corrosive terror." – New York Times Book Review "Captivating… a beautifully stirring account of life in an era of political oppression…[One Man's Bible] is an important book," – Fort Worth Star-Telegram "[Gao] paints a stark, unforgiving picture of the results of Mao's regime and of the Cultural Revolution." – Denver Post "If the hallmark of a good novel is its ability to transport the reader, willing or not, into unfamiliar or uncomfortable territory, then this novel is a success." – Denver Post
The Art of War (chinese)
Название The Art of War (chinese)
Автор(ы) произведения Sun Tzu
Жанр Историческая проза
Язык Chinese
Серия

Аннотация

(Chinese: 孫子兵法) is a Chinese military treatise written during the 6th century BC by Sun Tzu. Composed of 13 chapters, each of which is devoted to one aspect of warfare, it has long been praised as the definitive work on military strategies and tactics of its time.The Art of War is one of the oldest books on military strategy in the world. Like a work of mathematics or science, much of the work is dedicated to defining its concepts in what has been described as a series of formulas. It is the first and one of the most successful works on strategy and has had a huge influence on Eastern and Western military thinking, business tactics, and beyond. Sun Tzu was the first to recognize the importance of positioning in strategy and that position is affected both by objective conditions in the physical environment and the subjective opinions of competitive actors in that environment. He taught that strategy was not planning in the sense of working through a to-do list, instead it requires quickly responding appropriately to changing conditions. Planning works in a controlled environment, but in a competitive environment, competing plans collide creating situations that no one plans.The book was first translated into a European language in 1782 by French Jesuit Jean Joseph Marie Amiot, and had possibly influenced Napoleon, and even the planning of Operation Desert Storm. Leaders as diverse as Mao Zedong, General Pervez Musharraf, Vo Nguyen Giap, and General Douglas MacArthur have claimed to have drawn inspiration from the work.The Art of War has also been applied, with much success, to business and managerial strategies.